Collaborative content creation

A big problem with laws and other technical material produced for bureacratic use is that it is – for all practical purposes – limited to those who are well-versed in the jargon or those with an immense capacity to read through technical documentation. (This is not unlike similar practices where for eg only priests could read holy scripture). Opening up content, not only by putting it on the web, but also providing tools to review and comment it is a good idea.

Therefore, Sharedbook is a very welcome technology that encourages people to collaboratively comment and annotate content. This form of collaborative action is useful in growing communities and creating a more engaging electorate (or an enterprise workforce for that matter). As a champion of more direct and participatory democracy, this move has a lot of potential of driving transparency.

I mention Sharedbook, because this is being used by some in the current health care debate in the US. See Congressman John Culberson’s effort to get his constituents to engage themselves in the debate. There are similar technologies for co-creation of content (collaboratively creating content) — and hopefully we will see the electorate actually collaborating on creating content that can become law. NB! I am not advocating that untrained people replace laywers or other experts, but that people are encouraged to participate in shaping policy and help lawyers and the experts.

About francisds

I guide clients in choosing technology solutions to bring about change in how they engage with their constituents. I work by generating ideas and shaping opportunities that lead to implemented solutions. My specialization is in the design of solutions comprising business and community technologies. I thrive with simplifying complex tasks. I am passionate about societal engagement and business to community collaboration.
This entry was posted in collaboration, crowdsourcing, knowledge sharing, transparency. Bookmark the permalink.

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